The Cost of Connection

“You know what?” Trump added when told it appeared he had accused Ford of lying in a speech. “I’m not going to get into it, because we won. It doesn’t matter. We won.”

That quote was pulled from a recent CNN recap of a 60 Minutes interview with our President Donald Trump.

I feel like I can almost present this without adding any secondary commentary. There’s almost no need to explain the repulsiveness of this comment. Or of the man that said it. It’s like everytime you think he could be any viler, he achieves a new level of nastiness.

In this comment, he is literally saying, it doesn’t matter what he did or said, he won. It doesn’t matter how that win was acquired or what happened before or after it. It doesn’t even matter what his actions were. He’s smart, you’re dumb. He’s big, you’re little. He’s right, you’re wrong and there’s nothing you can do about it.

That’s right everyone, Trump is the living breathing embodiment of the father from one of my favorite books and movies, Matilda.

 Here's what the cast of Matilda look like now

(No hate for Danny Devito, though. He’s the absolute bee’s knees. )

And sadly, this is just the latest quib from the never-ending stream of word vomit spouted by a world leader that found it’s way into our screens, eyes, and eventually down deep into our souls. 

eyeboard

First, it was breaking news scrolling along the bottom of your regularly scheduled broadcasts.  Somehow it morphed and transformed to watching live feeds as our kids play in the park. It’s gotten to the point where there are gas pumps with news anchors that are all too happy to keep you up to date with the latest. And to top it off,  we now get Presidential Alerts straight to our phones whether we want them or not.

It’s everywhere and it’s inescapable.

It’s Orwellian.

And we keep going back for more.

 

We are more connected than ever before in our history. robin-worrall-749755-unsplash

We have knowledge that has been inaccessible for centuries at our fingertips. But with it, we have more lies and falsehoods spread by people who wish to prosper from our fear and confusion. Intentionally spread misinformation masquerades as truth and people gobble it up greedily, willingly feeding it to their family and friends too.

For those of us who identify as empaths, this constant level of connection is hard. Not only is it hard, but it’s also emotionally taxing. Every hour is a new struggle. Since the recent election, it seems that each refresh of CNN, scroll down Facebook, or conversation with an opinionated relative is a new episode of a personally written American Horror Story.  

I feel the price we pay for being that connected is something akin to a constant anxiety. It buzzes behind your eyes like phone notifications during a really hot group chat. And there is no way to turn it off. The anxiety finally heats up until it boils over and you are in a full state of fear. And after a while, that fear becomes an addiction. Just like checking Facebook and Twitter, it’s something you can’t stop doing. It’s part of your life.

Everywhere you look, everything you see is a reminder of just how fucked up the system is. It can make you scared and remind you that you’re wounded. Some of us show it by hiding. Some of us by showing our teeth and flashing our claws. But honestly, there is no right or wrong way to deal. While we all wade through the muck and mire of the sensationalized tragedies we have to remember not to judge the steps of others. It is not our place to tell them how they should or should not be reacting. 

How do we survive this? Not just as a nation, (which I promise you is a legitimate concern of mine) but as individual people? How do we disconnect from this constant barrage of information that we might want, but not need?

Dear Readers, I don’t know.

I don’t have the answers for you.

I don’t even have the answers for myself.

I’m stuck on this ouroboros of the digital age along with you. I don’t need another reason to stare at the ceiling of my bedroom after I go to bed at night. But here I am decompressing from all the content I’ve seen during the day. What headlines am I going to wake up to in a few hours? What outlandish shit is the President going to tweet in the middle of the night? When is that outlandish shit going to get us nuked into a Mad Max landscape? Or when will his Presidental Alerts have America looking more like Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and less like a nation it is?

eyeboard

We should be connected. We should be aware. Hell, as the young folk say, we should be woke. But we should also be whole. We should be full and centered. And above all, we should take care of ourselves. We should remember that we can not let our desire to fix the world tear us apart.

So let’s switch off the news, close the browser tab, and put the phone down. Go outside and hug a tree, worship the moon, or pet a dog.

Or we could burn this whole fucker down and start again. I don’t know. 

elijah-o-donnell-603766-unsplash.jpgLove yourself. Then, go and love each other. We are all in this together. 

Maybe, that will make things a little bit better.

It sure as shit can’t hurt.

2 thoughts on “The Cost of Connection

  1. Every word of this hurts, because it’s the truth.

    I’ve given up watching the news, because it’s just too much.
    I don’t do social media, because it’s just too much.

    All that knowledge at my fingertips, yet I don’t know how to sift out the fact from the fake, so I just don’t bother…

  2. Agree 100%. And I am stepping away from all the news for awhile – it’s not really “all news” anymore, it’s a lot of people talking about a headline. Instead of dissecting the vast amount of tax scamming done by the Trump Org in NY, it’s a rehash of the “horseface” tweet.

    I am renewing my commitment to my real-life community that I am here for them, for tea, woo-woo or just to listen. And do my own work. But to accomplish that, I need to step back from the mindlessly terrorizing TV coverage of this American Horror Show.

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