Stitchcraft: Triangluar Prism Bag

If you remember from my previous post The Subtle Art of Good Enough, sewing is one of my favorite hobbies. I grew up surrounded by women who could transform the simplest of fabrics into functional, sturdy clothing. Even though I didn’t join in until I was older and they were gone, a part of me feels connected to this art. To make it clear, I’m no Olivia Walker *. To me, as messy and beautiful as it is, sewing is an extension of my witchcraft.

Merriam Websters has the definition of witchcraft as :

1 a: the use of sorcery or magic
b: communication with the devil or with a familiar

Now, I don’t think my Singer sewing machine is a hotline to the devil (I mean really? Could it be so easy?) or a familiar (I usually try to keep her away from my fabric) but I will not discredit the sorcery it takes to turn a plain sheet of fabric into something functional and tangible. So, if I may be pompous, I present you with the Conjure and Coffee definition of Stitchcraft

Stitchcraft

1.a: the use of sorcery or magic using stitches made with needle and thread.

b: communication with the devil by yelling things like  “Goddamnit!”, “Oh shit!”, and/or by accident piercing one’s flesh with needles, pins, or scissors.

The first thing I’d like to share with you in my Stitchcraft series is something I am all about right making right now. I was pointed to this Craftster tutorial by a dear friend and fell in love! I mean really, how cute is a triangular prism for a makeup bag?

Quick side note: If you aren’t wise to the ways to Craftster, please, please check it out. There are SO MANY great tutorials. The user community is so vast and knowledgeable that inspiration abounds. Whatever craft makes your heart sing you’ll find a chorus for there.

On to the triangular prism makeup bag!

Following the measurements provided, I cut out the pattern for the bag out of everyday simple printer paper. I would advise to maybe cut the pattern out of a more stable medium. Printer paper is really flimsy. Cardstock would be a much better choice.

After measuring and cutting the pattern, I folded it in half, lining up the sides. Why? I prefer to cut on folds. I have no real reason, I feel that it helps me judge how much fabric I’m using. Once folded, I followed the directions and cut two out of the outer and inner fabrics.

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That’s when the fun started! It was time to attach the inner and outer fabric to the zipper! Zippers are still something I struggle to get “good enough”. Sometimes I can get them on no problem, other times it’s a garbage fire. Before I started sewing the zipper, I unzipped it enough so when I was finished sewing all the other sides I could turn the bag right side out.  For this project, I did an acceptable job with the zipper. I still have a little way to go before I master it, but I’m satisfied with my progress.

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One note about zippers: Make sure you check your zipper before using it. I bought a good size lot of zippers off Amazon. I didn’t go through and check their individual functionality. I just grabbed one that matched colors. The one I used for this bag was a little hiccupy the first few times I used it.

After doing that zipper magic to both sets of fabric, I did a seam down one side, stopping at the right angle edge. Then I sewed the bottom straight across. After that, I did the other side.

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Once those three sides were done, I pinched the cut out right angle looking edges together and zapped them under the sewing machine needle real quick. The bag finally took shape!

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I cleaned up some long leftover threads and turned it right side out. And BAM! A makeup bag is born!

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I love this tutorial and pattern so much!! It’s easy to assemble and pretty fun. The bag itself is really versatile. I keep saying its a makeup bag but really, you can use it for anything. About ten minutes after finishing the one I made for this post, my three year old had taken it for her Shopkins.

I hope you enjoyed the first Stitchcraft post!! This kind of post was a first for me. I’ve never really taken the time to chronicle making something. It was definitely a learning experience. But isn’t that what growing in the Craft is about? Manifesting something out of pure idea and energy is never easy. Hopefully, when I bring you another Stitchcraft post, it will be a bit more polished and a little more informative.

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  • But wait! Who’s Olivia Walker? Olivia Walker is the seamstress who for decades provided the colorful robes that The Nature Boy Ric Flair wore as he walked that aisle. Being a Southern girl who was the daughter of an independent wrestler (trust me, I’ll tell you about this later) Ric Flair and his flashy robes were my first taste of costuming and pageantry. Without these robes, you could make the argument that Naitch wouldn’t have been the character or champion he is known for being.

Ric_Flair_in_Seoul,_South_Korea

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